Category Archives: Uncategorized

Biosolids Link

Here is the link to the pdf mentioned on  my Facebook post.

FAQ_on_Biosolids_Management

Regional Councillor Jane Mitchell is Running for Re-Election in the City of Waterloo

Regional Councillor Jane Mitchell is running for re-election in the City of Waterloo.

“We will all miss Chair Ken Seiling’s steady hand. With a new Chair at the head of the Region, experienced councillors are needed,” says Jane.

Jane has a solid record of hard work and leadership. She is the past-chair of the Grand River Conservation Authority. This past term, as Chair of the Licensing and Hearing Committee she guided the creation  and updating of the vehicle for hire by-law that regulated and legalized services such as Uber, a process that has been very contentious in other municipalities. At the end of the process, her leadership as chair earned her a standing ovation from other councillors.

Jane attends hundreds of events, both big and small to help keep her hand on the pulse of her constituents. She works on numerous committees including, the Crime Prevention Council, Waste Management Master Plan, Alternate Transportation Advisory Committee, Budget, Planning and Works, Community Services. Jane is the Chair of the Employment and Income Support Advisory Committee which includes Ontario Works Clients and various representatives of community agencies.

This past term, Jane has worked on the Biosolids Master Plan, stopping a Biosolids Drying plant from being built at the Waterloo Landfill. She worked on the Waste Master Plan which led to the successful weekly diversion of organic waste to the green bin and onto compost and weekly recycle pickup throughout the Region. The introduction of every other week pickup of residual garbage saves the Region one million a year.

A user of public transit as well as a car driver, Jane is proud of her role in the expansion of the transit system and the introduction of the Ion. Roundabouts and road improvements and expansions have made driving easier. Segregated bike lanes and pedestrian sidewalks and trails on Regional roads will mean more options for people as they get around the Region. Two way all day trains from Toronto and GO from Cambridge are a must for the further prosperity of the Region.

Jane has recently been working on the Regional Housing Master Plan which is proposed to increase the amount of social housing in Waterloo Region. She wants to continue tackling homelessness and the creation of social housing

It is no coincidence that the Region of Waterloo is booming. Over 2.1 billion dollars of development is occurring. Waterloo has seen the expansion of both Universities and Conestoga College with the support of the Region. The Region of Waterloo has racked up a triple A rating from Moody’s for the last 18 years as long as Jane has been on council.

Jane championed the countryside line, the Environmentally Sensitive Landscapes, and urban intensification to help protect our valuable farmland. As Chair of the GRCA, she oversaw projects to keep the Grand River watershed mostly flood free and the water clean. Large investments have been made to keep our drinking water pure.

This is only a taste of the work Jane has done as a councillor. Jane’s hard work, experience and leadership keep the Region of Waterloo and the City of Waterloo vibrant and a great place to live. There is more to be done and she will do it.

Can the Ion Use Renewable Energy?

Regional Staff have responded to my request to look into using Renewable Energy to power the Ion. Here is the memo. With I will say, a lot of research by staff

The Memo sent to Regional Councillors is below:

Region staff have looked at a few possible options to provide renewable power for the ION system.

The chart below shows the mix of electric power sources in Ontario.   Approximately 33% of the normal power in the grid comes from renewable sources.  The majority of the power (63%) comes from nuclear energy with the  remainder (4%) from gas/oil.

2017 Transmission-Connected Generator Output

Nuclear Hydro Gas/Oil Wind Biofuel Solar
2017 (TWh) 90.6 37.7 5.9 9.2 0.4 0.5
2017 (% of total) 63% 26% 4% 6% <1% <1%

link http://www.ieso.ca/corporate-ieso/media/year-end-data

 

Possible ways to use all or more renewable energy for the ION include:

  1. Region or other party creates specific source of power (solar and/or wind)
  2. Region uses the power from Region’s existing solar power installations
  3. Region purchases green power from a supplier of green power

Each of the options is reviewed briefly with some discussions of pros and cons:

Option 1. Region or other party creates specific source of power (solar and/or wind)

  • Region is completely in control
  • Wind power has not been shown to economical in Waterloo Region.  Wind farm would have to be somewhere else
  • Both wind and solar would require supplemental power sources and can only partially offset power from the grid
  • Cost for this option are relatively high both capital and ongoing operations and maintenance (staff have not attempted to quantify the cost)
  • Would require significant land for the solar/wind farms
  • Region would be committed to this power source in the long term even if better alternatives became available
  • Could be used to partially offset grid power

Option 2

  • Region currently has a contract for this power that pays significantly higher than current cost of electricity.  If the contract were broken this revenue would be lost.
  • Once the contract is over this option could be re-evaluated to determine if power generation continues from these facilities and whether that power should be used to power the ION.

Option 3.

  • Provides flexibility for Region to purchase more or less green power
  • Region can change to other source including implantation of own power sources at any time
  • Region is not responsible for capital, operations or maintenance
  • Allows easy transition to another option should that be desired in the future.

 

Based on the above Region staff believe that the best option at this time is Option 3.

Region staff approached a supplier of green power (who wished to remain unnamed) to determine what the cost might be to implement Option 3.  This is not a firm estimate as that would still need to be determined once the exact power requirements are known.

The quote below gives 100%, 50% and 25% percentage of green electricity supply for the total electricity  consumption predicted for LRT.

The cost of electricity for the LRT would be increase by $300K, $150K and $75K annually, depending on the supply percentages of total consumption, on the top of the predicted annual budget ($1.5M).  Please note these costs are for electricity supply only and do not include deliver and other costs that are on every electricity bill.

Green House Gas Reductions:

It is important to note that with the current mix sources of electricity (nuclear, hydro, gas/oil etc), as noted above, that electricity from the grid already has low greenhouse gas emissions as a result of the low percentage of electricity from gas/oil.  This gives an emission factor of 0.043 tonnes of ghg per MWh used, of if multiplied by 12,000MWh, equals to around 520 tonnes per year. Or  $576/tonne of ghg reduced ($300K / 520 tonnes).  Greenhouse gas reductions from switching to renewable energy for the ION would be relatively low and costly.

At this stage it is recommended that ION be powered using grid power.  Alternatives to this can be periodically evaluated to see if they are worth pursuing.

 

It’s Christmas! How about those Homeless Addicts.

It’s Christmas! Just tonight CTV showed schoolkids doling out soup to the homeless and addicts at the soup kitchen. However, you would never know the time of year by the people writing to me and to Facebook about the possibility of a safe injection site in Waterloo Region, particularly Galt.

The worst I saw was a post on Facebook with a picture of a man having a seizure in a Galt mini-mart. The poster was angry that he dare to be homeless and a drug addict and collapsing in a public place. Particularly disturbing to me, as the wife, mother and grandmother of people who have epilepsy and, while controlled, could have a seizure anywhere.

I understand that people in Cambridge are upset after a little boy ended up pricked by a needle left in a park. I understand people suffering from mental illness can seem scary. Writing to your council telling them you want the House of Friendship to not open a new house to support recovering addicts, you want the Bridges closed and all people who seem to be addicts or homeless removed from your community is too much.

Public Health is conducting a survey on opinions concerning Safe Injection Sites for the provincial government. The Region of Waterloo has not yet had any report on this and certainly we have not had any suggestions on where this site would be or even what it would look like. Thank you to the people who have suggested also having help, whether mental or social services, available for people using the site.

Right now no one knows what drugs contain deadly fentanyl. Recently a 14 year old boy died from one mistake. Injecting drugs is only a small part of the drug problem. Some say safe injection sites can stop needles from being left in parks and secluded areas.  People using needles will not stop using them. Clean needles are given out to stop the sharing of needles which spreads hepatitis and AIDS.

For many years, Downtown Kitchener had the overwhelming majority of services for the poor and the lost, as council always heard from Mayor Carl Zehr. Now Waterloo has second stage housing for homeless men, women and children and Cambridge has the Bridges.  All homeless need a permanent home, not being driven from city to city. Many addicts have underlying mental problems

Every drug addict and homeless person is someone’s family and friend. I remember when a well known Kitchener homeless man died, his family sent donuts to the Kitchener police to thank them for their help.

It’s Christmas. A couple of weeks ago I attended a regular Sunday service at St. John the Divine Cathedral in New York City. I had walked up two quiet rain washed blocks from the subway stop by Central Park to the side of the cathedral. Two homes made of cardboard, blankets and a tarp snuggled between the buttresses  that held up the church. I walked past and around the corner and attended the service.

Sitting among the members of the church was a man with dirty hair and shabby clothes, obviously homeless, yet obviously accepted by the congregation. After the service, I passed the cardboard and tarps as I headed back to the subway.  One of the “homes” was empty. It seemed it belonged to the grubby man in the cathedral.

Are we going to be like the congregation of St John the Divine Cathedral and accept those in difficulty or are we only going to reject them and make the problem worse?

Here are some links:

Waterloo Region Drug Strategy

Safe Injection Site Survey

A Tour of Social Housing in Rome Created in the Early 20th Century

(If you are looking for my paper on cleaning up the Grand, protection of local aquifers and the Regional Plan, as mentioned in the Record, scroll down, it is the fourth entry.)

At the International Making Cities Liveable Conference, I was pleased to tour the Housing Districts of Testaccio and San Saba with Ettore Maria Mazzola, Architect & Urbanist, Professor, University of Notre Dame, Rome Global Gateway. Ettore Maria Mazzola has also acted as a consultant for the Mayor and City of Rome. As a member of the new Housing Master Plan Committee, this area will be on my mind as we decide how to create and improve social housing in Waterloo Region.

Similar to Waterloo Region today, the City of Rome, Italy exploded in population between the unification of Italy (1861) and 1930. The population of the city of Rome increased from 200.000 to 1.200.000. Most of the people came from rural villages in Italy.  this created a shortage of housing. It was decided that the area around the artificial Testaccio hill would be used to create housing for the poor. In antiquity the area was a dump for broken amphorae and in later times an area for butchering and tanning.  The area of San Saba was also developed.

The municipal government of the Rome of the time owned and built this social housing. Instead of creating a slum, Roman architects such as Gustavo Giovannoni, Quadrio Pirani, Giulio Magni, and Innocenzo Sabbatini developed a new way of creating housing integrating a mix of uses. They were able to harmonize “the construction of large volumes” with “a proper scale that does not harm the landscape”, as well as “the necessity to build rapidly” with “respect for the human dignity of the future residents”.

These neighbourhoods create a good example for the “new urbanism” with density and mixed use. Some of the housing complexes had bicycle rooms and bake ovens. Each development was built with a central courtyard to remind the residents of their homes in the hill villages.

Maria Montessori created the first daycare or early learning center in this area. The concept of free play and learning by choice instead of strict rows and rote started here.

Today this social housing has gentrified and is no longer home to the poor. It is still a beautiful example of housing.

Stay tuned for public consultations on Region of Waterloo social housing  in the coming months. As can be seen by the pictures below, just building more affordable housing, while laudable, isn’t enough. We must also build liveable communities.

 

How one man’s creative, coherent view transformed social housing in interwar Rome

Specific Interesting Photos of the Housing.

bicyclestorage

Door to an original bicycle storage

firestation

Fire station

montessori

One of the original Maria Montessori Preschools for the poor

socialhousinginrome

Early 20th century social housing

socialhousinginrome1

Early 20th century social housing

socialhousinginrome2

Bake house

socialhousinginrome3

Housing built around a piazza to remind residents of their villages

socialhousinginrome6

Piazza in the center of the housing complex

socialhousinginrome7

Windows of different sizes to visually break up the wall

When they Go Low, We Say No!

By Guest Blogger Mary Ann, who left Canada to march in Washington

When the American election happened, I was so shocked and so was my sister.  Right afterwashingtonmarch the election there was an overwhelming feeling that we must do something. Because when the American elephant rolls over, the Canadian mouse can get crushed.

On the 17th of November, we booked our hotel room.We looked for buses and people were already booking buses. It was an organic and grassroots movement, no official organizers at that time. There were 7 buses going from Franklin Maryland so that’s where we booked. Everything was moving marywashingtonby the 17th.

I had to do something with women. The election was a slap to my whole sense of being a woman. That the most qualified woman lost to a clown. Women suddenly began to tell their stories. One man on our bus came because for the first time his wife told him her stories, the sexism that had happened to her in her life. We all began to tell our husbands and friends what has happened to us in our lives.

busandmarchBefore Christmas, they were trying to stop the march, I felt, saying women couldn’t get the permits, couldn’t use the Mall. It was a moment of faith, we all went anyway. Women showed up individually not part of the “official” march. They weren’t the leaders, women just came. It wasn’t about the celebrities, most couldn’t hear them. Women came from all over the states.

I was too young to burn my bra. To get to 57 and never been on a march. Most of the women had never been on a march or political ever. A lot were marching for their dead mothers. I felt letdown as a woman and I needed to gather.

We found out we were not alone! A million, yes it was a million, got off their asses and marched in Washington and millions more knitted hats, sat in coffee shops and cheered. Millions more marched in cities around the world.

You didn’t know everyone was going to wear the pussy hats but everyone did and everyone had a handmade sign.

Marchers were stunned and grateful we came from Canada. They were terrified when they found out that Canadians were turned away at the border. They then knew that bad things were happening already.

A Metro staff member started to cry when she found out that we came to support American women. She said, “I’m black, female and gay. I’m the one they hate.”

Women on the bus were amazed that I was once a school trustee. I told them they have to fill  all the positions: council, trustees, sheriff, and then  move on to the higher offices.  That’s what the Republicans have done. Make sure the person is electable. When I told them about our popular Canadian Sikh defense minister, they were shocked that could happen. They all love Justin Trudeau.

This march shows us what’s possible in Waterloo Region, in Canada, in America, all over the world. This is the Women’s uprising, like the Arab Spring. Now I will do something.

Disruptive Technology and the End of the Backbone of Our Economy: the Middle Class Family.

This past week, Waterloo Region Council continued our work on the new taxi by-law that will include Uber and other new types of vehicles for hire. Council members spoke excitedly about the potential of disruptive technology. Rideco, a local app based shuttle business, told us that part of what they do as a tech firm is research ways to make driverless cars a viable business.

Driverless cars. My baby boom friends are so excited about them. As they age, they won’t have to give up their  car. In ten years, if not sooner, everyone can have one. Will everyone want one?

When I was first married, my in-laws ran rental cottages in the Halliburton Highlands. Across the road from them lived a family on a half acre with ranch house and lawn rider grass. The dad was a trucker who ferried goods from Toronto to the stores and supermarkets of cottage country. His wife was a teller at the local bank. They lived a good middle class country life. Their daughter grew up to work in the bank. I don’t know what their son did, but he may also have been a truck driver. Once again, a good life. Their millennial grandchildren could also squeeze out that life for a few years if they are lucky. The present generation of school-age children? Not happening when they grow up.

With all the excitement about disruptive technology, only a few seem to be talking about the effect of all these changes on the average person. It’s fluffed off with, “Oh, we’ll get the jobs back from China.” “It’s up to them to retrain for something (what?) else”.

Driverless cars will mean driverless trucks and driverless taxis, buses and shuttles.

 

According to Service Canada Truck driver statistics; 69,300 people are truck drivers. 97.1 percent of them are men, 92 percent are between 24 and 64 years old, 70% have high school or post-secondary education, and only two percent of them are bachelors. There is a shortage of long haul truckers at the present time. Average salary is around 40,000.

According to the 2006 census, pre-Uber, there were 50,000 taxi cab drivers in Canada. 21,050 bus, shuttle, and subway operators worked in 2013.

Approximately 140,356 good paying jobs will vanish in 15 to 20 years due to driverless cars. For taxi cab drivers, good paying full time jobs are disappearing now with the growth of ridesharing apps.

You may ask why didn’t Regional council just ban Uber if they are a bad employer? That is not the job of Regional government. We look after such things as requiring criminal background checks and safety inspected cars. It is up to the provincial government to make employment laws that regulate industries (Not just Uber) who say those who work for them are private contractors not employees.

The citizens of the Region like the convenience and features of the new apps. That is not the problem. The problem is that Uber runs on a part-time contractor model instead of employing people. A ridesharing company in Montreal, Teo Taxi, pays employees  15 dollars an hour.

But this dispute will be finished when driverless cars and trucks appear.

The wife in the middle class family I mentioned above will also see her job disappear. 46,000 positions in 2014, 90 percent between 24 and 64 years old, 98 percent women, 79 percent full time and $34,900 annually.Bank machines and self checkouts in grocery stores are eliminating white collar jobs as well.

Secretaries and executive assistants now transcribe minutes directly into laptops set up with the meeting minutes template. Everyone is is paperless, no more photocopying. We all look after our own calendars and memos. Bills are paid electronically. People use a computer program to do their taxes and finances instead of hiring a bookkeeper.  Huge numbers of white collar jobs are disappearing. 

Statistics Canada says of administrative and secretarial positions as of 2014,

Over the past few years the number of secretaries has decreased very sharply. Implementation of office automation and the diversification of administrative staff duties explain this decrease to a large extent. Since these changes are already well established, the number of secretaries should decrease significantly over the next few years, but at a much less spectacular pace than before.

Where will these employees go? What will happen to those middle class families who managed so well up to the year 2000? How will they support themselves and their families? Where and at what will the majority of school children of today do to make a decent living? We need  a serious conversation about employment and disruptive technology.